@csalzman they are DMT DiaSharps, which are a bit spendy (but not quite Japanese water stone spendy). I asked for gift cards to Lee Valley for Christmas and birthday this year :).

A little project I finished this weekend around taking more rotting drywall out of my garage: a holder for my diamond stones! It's got a pad on the bottom and everything. First time using the hand router plane!

Now to figure out how to efficiently resharpen said router's iron :).

Somebody lost a camera that has photos on it they really want back 😬

Kveldssanger remains a goddamn masterpiece.

It's interesting. I used to voraciously read fantasy; much of that has now shifted to voraciously reading history. It is actual history that has raised my standards for fiction. Real people and events turn out to frequently be weirder, more interesting, and certainly more shocking than fiction :).

I really should start that podcast where I tell history like a story instead of as a collection of facts and dates.

Anyhow, not sure there's been a better fantasy show, and it has set the bar really quite high indeed; I mostly really liked it despite my reservations about the shift in storytelling once they really ran out of Martin's material and the jettisoning of interesting plot through-lines. But I also think that _Martin_ got lost in a maze somewhere in the middle of the third book and may not himself have any idea how this was supposed to work.

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Lol, found someone’s old weed stash and rolling papers behind a ceiling panel in the garage.

Anyone else have this thing where they often can't just tackle a book head on and have to sort of sneak up on the idea of reading a thing they'd been interested in reading for ages from the side, often by reading a couple other things first? No? Yes?

related: I would be happy to lend this behemoth tome out, should anyone local be interested.

Finished Jason Lutes' "Berlin" epic graphic novel, and... quite liked it? I think? It felt a lot more striking to me than graphic novels usually do, and there were some really nice sequences that did something truly artistic with the form.

It's a collection of (spoilers: mostly sad or affecting) stories about life in a particular place and at a particular time in its history. If you love graphic novels or Weimar Germany, I'd recommend it.

Saw "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote" last night and boy _that_ was a weird one. First: the female characters are... *problematic* in an extremely 90s way.

The rest of it was insane; often uproariously funny, frequently baffling, at times symbolically overloaded, at times gratuitous. Less a meditation on delusion, creation, and agency and more a swan dive off a cliff into those rocky waters. If I knew the source material better more of it might have clicked. Pryce and Driver are tremendous.

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